Many Paths of Recovery

Many Paths

Slaying The Dragon

Slaying The Dragon

The product of more than 35 years of research, the second edition of Slaying the Dragon: The History of Addiction Treatment and Recovery in America is the remarkable story of America’s personal and institutional responses to alcoholism and other addictions. It is the story of mutual aid societies spanning Native American recovery circles, the Washingtonians, the Ribbon Reform Clubs, Twelve Step Fellowships and more recent secular and religious mutual aid alternatives. It is a story of addiction treatment institutions from the inebriate asylums through rise of … Continue reading

Common Sense Recovery: An Atheist’s Guide to Alcoholics Anonymous

CSR Cover

This book was never meant to be published. Written over time as a personal project of trying to understand what it means to be an atheist in AA, it is the distillation of the author’s personal thoughts on every aspect of the situation, and there are many. It contains the essence of his journey towards completeness, as an atheist and an anonymous alcoholic, a person who has found his way in sorting out the tension between the two and arriving at peace and wholeness for himself. … Continue reading

The Wellness-Recovery Connection

The Wellness-Recovery Connection

This book aims to add something to recovery programs that is often absent: a wellness lifestyle. In the past many have thought it odd that 12-Step recovery programs do not include Steps that promote proper nutrition and physical fitness. John Newport wrote this book to make up for that omission, and indicates that it is also “fully compatible with other orientations to recovery that depart from the 12-step model.” The extra elements that wellness adds to recovery are found in the the following chapters in … Continue reading

Now What?

Now What?

This book describes itself as an insider’s guide to addiction and recovery, and attempts to provide a little bit of everything for everybody. It begins with a description of the brain disease of addiction in the first chapter, entitled “Swiss Cheese: The Addicts Brain on Drugs.” He does a rather credible job of explaining how drugs hijack the addict’s brain and goes some distance towards justifying a disease model of alcholism and addiction. The second chapter, “Bowling and Addiction,” is another metaphor and compares addiction … Continue reading

Beyond the Influence

Beyond the Influence

This book is a convincing argument for the medical model of alcoholism, with resulting recommendations for treatment. Authors Katherine Ketcham (who previously co-authored Under the Influence: A Guide to the Myths and Realities of Alcoholism) and William Asbury maintain that alcoholism is a true medical disease rooted in abnormalities in brain chemistry. Alcoholics bodies simply respond differently to alcohol than everyone elsesa difference that is either rooted in genetics or acquired by intense and sustained exposure to alcohol. Alcoholism is not, they emphasize, a personality … Continue reading

The Addictive Personality

The Addictive Personality

In this second edition of The Addictive Personality, author Craig Nakken brings a new dimension to the understanding of how an individual becomes an addict. Going beyond the definition that limits dependency to the realm of alcohol and other drugs, Nakken discusses the common denominator of all addiction and describes how the process is progressive. Through research and practical experience, Nakken describes addiction as a process that is progressive: “Rather than being rigid, addiction is continually changing. As it changes, it inflicts changes on the person … Continue reading